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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
in afghanistan. they also have the pakistani taliban attacking them. we're also the point of a new low in u.s.-pakistani relations. so the idea that pakistan would instigate a crisis with india at this point is inconceivable to me. >> what about indian intelligence-gathering and a security? there have been a number of threats, particularly since 2008. is this any reflection on the indian authorities competence in this area? >> there will be questioned about another attack in mumbai. again, four attacks in the last 10 years. after 2008, there were major reviews within india about internal security, and in this case, there will be a very close examination of how quickly india responded. they have their national security guard deployed there. they have friends a unit on the scene. they need to hopefully -- they have forensic units on the scene. they need to hopefully see having that experience corrected in that beleaguered city. >> in other news, police and venezuela have regained control of a prison east of the capital after a standoff that lasted for 27 days. more than 800 inmates have not g
of honor, today for heroism in afghanistan. during a fight in 2008, sergeant first class leroy petry was shot in both legs and lost his right hand when he tried to throw back an enemy grenade. his actions saved two other rangers. president obama presented the medal at a white house ceremony this afternoon. later, outside the white house, petry said all of the troops serving overseas are heroes. >> whenever you have a chance or opportunity to thank them, check them, give them a pat on the back for the job they've done because they've earned it. that's the british award any service member can get is just a simple thank you. >> sreenivasan: petry is the 149th recipient of the medal of honor, and he is only the second living service member to receive one for service in iraq or afghanistan. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: next tonight, an assassination in afghanistan takes the life of the president's half-brother. >> ahmed wali karzai had survived previous attempts on his life but today a family friend finally did what others could not. the provi
afghanistan today. four nato troops were killed in bombings in the east and south. and, eleven afghan policemenç died in separate attacks. amid the killings, general david petraeus-- commander of u.s. and nato troops in afghanistan-- handed over his duties. he is leaving to lead the central intelligence agency. his replacement is u.s. marine corps general john allen. >> it is my intention to maintain the momentum of this campaign, this great campaign on which we have embarked. i will continue to support in every way possible, the recruiting, the training, preparation and equipping and the fielding and the employment of the afghaf oational security forces.ç >> sreenivasan: allen's tenure began just a day after taliban insurgents claimed another high- profile assassination. a close aide to afghan president hamid karzai was killed sunday in a gunbattle at his home in kabul. it followed the murder of karzai's half-brother last week. for more on afghanistan we turn to pam constable, who covers south asia for the "washington post." pam, thanks for being with us. the series of high prof
-- investigator. the prime minister arrived from afghanistan into the storm. >> we need to have an inquiry, possibly inquiries into what has happened. we are no longer talking about politicians and celebrities. we're talking about murder victims, potentially terrorist victims, having their phones tapped into. >> what happened in the newsroom of the news of the world is already being investigated by 50 police officers. now there will be inquiries into why the police took so long to take this seriously. what is wrong with the british media? this all began with the imprisonment four years ago of the upload news of the world," royal editor. also in prison was this man. >> due to legal constraints, the state of coming home or come in at the moment. >> it is his notes of private phone numbers that have fueled this dog up. that and the mounting anger of mps who have said that police do not want to investigate what he has done. rupert murdoch issued a statement describing what had happened as deplorable and unacceptable. he stated that "our company must fully cooperate with the police and said tha
afghanistan. the attack happened in an area due to be handed over to afghan control later this week. it also coincided with the departure of america's top commander, general david petraeus. he is leaving to become head of the cia. u.s. marine corps general allan will take over control of the forces in afghanistan. the u.s. senate will hold daily sessions including the weekend until legislation is passed to raise the government limit on borrowing. the senate majority leader said it was necessary to prevent the u.s. from defaulting on its debt. talks have taken place between the u.s. government officials and representatives of the libyan leader muammar gaddafi's government. this comes after months of air strikes bombarded in the country. for more on what the talks entailed, i am joined by andrew north. what is the significance of this meeting coming so soon after the u.s. government recognized the rebels as the legitimate governing authority? >> there is a direct link. u.s. officials have been clear to point that out. having said they now recognize it after delaying it for some time, this unde
. >> sreenivasan: in afghanistan, ahmed wali karzai was buried in kandahar, a day after he was gunned down by a close confidant. his half-brother, president hamid karzai, joined thousands of mourners at the service, oppealing for an end thev iolence. at one point, tde prentsi climbed is. iwn hos hours later, a suicide bombing killed five french soldiers in eastern afghanistan. they were guarding a meeting of local leaders. the rupert murdoch media empire news corporation dropped its bid today to take over british sky broadcasting. it was the latest fallout from the firestorm of allegations that murdoch tabloids hacked into phones of celebrities, royals and even murder victims. we have a report from gary gibbon of independent television news. >> reporter: for decades, he's loomed over british politics. feted by politicians, rarely denied his wishes. but today, parliament rose up as one, all three main parties united, telling rupert murdoch he could not expand his media ownership here, right now. and he buckled. in a statement on their takeover plans, news corp said thait was too difficult t
are investigating the case of james phillips and, killed in afghanistan. according to his father, e-mail messages he received after his death had been read. he suspects, by hackers. >> they should suffer whatever punishment is appropriate. i'm sure that will happen. it is going to take time. >> rebecca brooks, picture leading news international tonight. criminal investigation, public inquiries. the scrutiny of what went on at her newspaper could continue for years. >> for more on today's news, i'm joined from london by author and journalist peter preston who was the editor of the guardian for a number of years. if i could start, could you explain to viewers around the world and here in the united states just how big a deal this story is and the latest developments art? >> it was all about celebrities. it was difficult to get the public engaged in that. this week, when it was revealed that the telephone of the 13- year-old murder victim had been packed into and a whole variety of other car stories -- hacked into, and a whole variety of other horror stories emerged, now you have a toxic image for the
at bay. now, to afghanistan where five people were killed today in a blast inside a mosque. the attack was carried out by a man who hit explosives in his turban. it happened in kandahar during a memorial service to president karzai's brother was assassinated this week. for more of the president brothers and the governor were in kandahar. >> another deadly attack in the heart of kandahar. top afghan officials were attending a prayer service for the president's half brother when the bomber struck. elite police units secured the area. among the dead, an influential cleric. a man opposed to the taliban. like so many other tax, the brunt of it was borne by ordinary afghans. more people are also dying from nato air strikes. late on wednesday, six villages were attacked among the victims, women and children. it led to a wave of anger. protests have taken place pressing for the withdrawal of western forces. that is about to happen imminently. some are wondering, at what cost? starting next week and over the next several months, thousands of nato troops have begun to a withdrawal. handing over
about libya and the role the u.k. is playing in that, afghanistan. this is all a distraction from a major geopolitical agenda. >> ifill: with all of those things on his plate, though, richard... david cameron. i'm getting everyone's names mixed up tonight. he lives to fight another day? >> yes, i think so. as you said earlier, there were a number of investigations. there's a criminal investigation we will be finding out... there will be a drip feed of e-mails, of reports, of parliamentary select committees and, you know, this will continue to be a bad news story for david cameron. how much worse it get december pends on the contents of some of those e-mails. >> ifill: i guess we have no choice but to watch. richard add dallas, heather conley, thank you both so much. >> brown: next, compelling insurers to cover contraception. the new health care reform law that president obama signed last year not only expands the number of people who get coverage. it also requires the secretary of health and human services to determine which preventive benefits should be provided by all insurers.
bin laden, not to attack saudi arabia, because he was outside, he was in afghanistan, not to attack saudi arabia. in this country, if you and i re talking about the mafia, we'd call it protectionmoney. that is one area. the people who investigated 9/11, and earlier at the cia, concluded that the saudis had been paying protection money for a long time. the second area that i think is especially interesting, and that both the joint inqui for congress and the 9/11 commission people delved into is the evidence on the ground in california, where the first two terrorists, the ones already identified by the cia, arrived. they arrived and the evidence suggests that an imam, the religious man at the saudi consulate first okayed them as sort -- first gave them a sort of tour of the area in los angeles. after that, the two of them connected with another saudi, who was paid from official sources, but apparently not for doing any known work, who had been thought of for a long time as a saudi agent. they connected with him in a meeting that was odd. he says he heard arabic being spoken in a resta
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)